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Candid

Confessions of a Creative TV Executive

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“I’ve realised that till the time you become creative director, there is hardly anything creative you can do”

Class is eternal, fame is fleeting, what continues is the struggle. Ever since I learnt of the media, I knew it had to be the entertainment industry for me. After internships with a couple of channels, I joined as the associate creative head of a popular production house that produces television soaps. I recently changed companies. I’ve realised that till the time you become creative director, there is hardly anything creative you can do. All I could do was follow the creative director’s orders with no original input of my own.

My work involves interaction with almost everyone on the set, from the channel head and production house chairman, to celebrities, spot boys, the dressman, production manager and other crew members. I have to deal with celebrities almost every day. I haven’t faced too much of a problem managing them, though. Usually, most of them are very finicky about what they wear and return the clothes if they are not pleased. That’s the only trouble they cause. You just need to give them what they want and you’re sorted—even though this usually causes the budget to go haywire.

Also, I figured that, while working on the same project for a long time, the leads of the shows tend to have affairs with each other. Oh, and I’ve also realised that the sweeter the guy looks, the meaner he is. In fact, guys are like Bournville— they are yum at first, but once you have a fling with them, you realise that you have so many cavities that you need a root canal and you finally see your chocolate being eaten by someone else!

There really isn’t any gender bias at my post, but yes, the casting couch exists, both for girls and boys. There is a lot of flesh being traded to earn work in this industry.

(She has been in the entertainment industry for about a year and recently became a programming consultant)

As told to Udita Chaturvedi