ADD

Trafficker

Confessions of a Drug Peddler

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“I was young, eager to make money, and willing to take risks. How else could two unemployed college students make Rs 6,000 a week?”

I started selling hashish, along with a friend, when I was in college. We put together around Rs 10,000 and scored a few grams, which I sold to some friends. While the profit margin wasn’t bad— several thousand rupees—it was clear that we had a business to build. We had to take care of the local police, the college security and the courier service which helped us transfer drugs. Now, we not only have a large clientele, but also the contacts to get us out of a mess.

Two years into the business, I had made enough connections to secure a ‘front’—the supplier gives me hash, I pay a fortnight later. This is how most hash is sold, since small distributors or new traffickers don’t have the cash to pay upfront. Eventually, the urge to make more profit grew, and I started travelling to Parvati valley in Himachal Pradesh, home to the best quality hash, myself. The profit margin now was some 35 per cent of the investment.

I was young, eager to make money, and willing to take the risk. How else could two unemployed college students make Rs 6,000 a week? Soon, cocaine came into the picture. We knew several big events coming up were prime for cocaine users. Luckily, we had stumbled upon an excellent cocaine connection in Goa. That first purchase was a risky investment; we spent Rs 35,000 on a kilo.

Once you’re in this game, there are no easy exits. The people involved at a higher level don’t let you quit, and then, the money is such an addiction. It’s been seven years now, and I am still going strong. It’s just that I don’t ship drugs any more as the security is high and getting caught is a headache.

There is a huge risk, but the money I make in return blurs it. I have been arrested a few times, but I get away by either bribing people or getting a few of my new clients caught. My family don’t want anything to do with me anymore. It doesn’t matter, since I have a bigger apartment and more luxuries than I would have had with my folks.

As told to Antara Chatterjee